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What is presbyopia?
What is the best way to correct presbyopia?
Will I get used to wearing progressives?
What type of progressive will help me see better?
Will my eyes need a higher prescription if I use progressives or reading glasses a lot?
I wear progressives all day long and they’re just fine. But I find that my eyes tire a lot when I’m at the computer. Is there a special kind of lens for working at the computer?
I wear my progressives all day and have no problems except that I get a bit dizzy when I’m driving. Is there a solution?
What does it mean if your eyes are “zero prescription”?
What is nearsightedness (myopia)?
What is farsightedness (hyperopia)?
Will a child with hyperopia always need glasses?
What is astigmatism?
What steps can I take to avoid needing a higher prescription?
My eyes get very tired when I drive at night. Is there a solution?
I don’t need prescription glasses, but my eyes get tired when I’m at the computer. Is there a solution?
How can I choose the best sun protection for my eyes?
Is it wrong to wear sunglasses without UV (Ultra Violet) protection or is it the same as not wearing sunglasses?
What are polarized sunglasses?

 

  What is presbyopia?
Presbyopia is a disorder that is caused by a decline in the eye’s amplitude of accommodation and involves needing glasses to read. A normal eye can focus alternately on near and far objects, thanks to the elasticity of the crystalline lens. However, as people grow older, the crystalline lens gradually loses its elasticity and they have trouble reading. Presbyopia begins to be a common complaint at the age of 40-45.

The main symptom of presbyopia is the inability to perform visual tasks in the near-vision field. Presbyopes usually have to hold objects at a distance from the eyes (a problem that is accentuated when there is little light, when objects or print are very small and when a person is very tired). Other signs and symptoms include headaches.
 

 

 

 

 

  What is the best way to correct presbyopia?
There are a number of solutions: conventional near-vision glasses, reading glasses, bifocals, trifocals and progressives.

Progressive lenses are a good solution for presbyopes because they combine the necessary optical compensation to correct far, intermediate and near vision in a single lens. Furthermore, progressive lenses provide a series of advantages over bifocal and trifocal lenses:

• Smooth transition between focal lengths.
• The eyes can focus at any distance (far, near and INTERMEDIATE vision).
• Progressives are more attractive than bifocal and trifocal lenses.
• They do not make you look older.
• They are easier to adapt to than bifocals and trifocals.

So with progressive lenses, you gain in aesthetics and comfort.
 

 

 

 

 

  Will I get used to wearing progressives?
As with bifocals, it takes a certain amount of time to adapt to using progressives.

• You have to learn to direct your eyes. Given that each point on the lens corridor has a different prescription, designed to provide sharp vision at different distances, it is necessary to learn (subconsciously) what part of the lens you must look through to see something at a specific distance. Because the corridor is designed to coincide with the natural position of the eyes for each distance, learning to direct the eyes is not complicated. It soon becomes as natural and automatic as walking or breathing.
• You also need to get used to combining eye and head movements to locate objects at the side, particularly in the intermediate zone.
• The fields of vision may seem narrower, particularly in the intermediate zone. This sensation disappears when you learn how to adjust the position of your head and eyes. This soon becomes instinctive.
• A sensation of movement (waves) may occur in peripheral vision, but will disappear in time. This is because the lens periphery contains zones where vision is unavoidably less sharp. The effect is more noticeable in progressives where the power is not distributed smoothly and when the degree of presbyopia is high.
• It is perfectly normal for a client to need a week to get used to wearing progressive lenses. The adaptation period may even last as long as three weeks, depending on the client. It should be borne in mind that, even when users have worn progressives for some time and have adapted completely to them, they may go through another short period of adaptation if any changes are made in new lenses (prescription, frame, etc.).
• INDO progressive lenses are designed to minimize all these effects and thereby facilitate and shorten the adaptation period.

Given the variable geometry of progressive lenses, the combinations of curvatures may produce troublesome reflections under certain circumstances. An antireflective coating is therefore advisable.
 

 

 

 

 

  What type of progressive will help me see better?
We don’t all work under the same conditions, nor do we have the same interests, the same habits or the same needs. We all have different lifestyles and ways of looking at things. Studies on human visual strategy carried out by INDO have made it possible to develop its personalized EyeMADE lenses, made to measure to meet the requirements of each person’s unique way of looking. This makes adapting to progressive lenses considerably easier.
Although personalization is thought to be the best correction method for progressive lenses, Indo has also developed specialized lenses such as LifeMADE Inicia (for people just getting started with progressive lenses) and LifeMADE Expert (for people who have used progressive lenses before).
 

 

 

 

 

  Will my eyes need a higher prescription if I use progressives or reading glasses a lot?
Presbyopia is progressive and it usually increases unavoidably until it becomes stable around the age of 65. The eye’s prescription is a purely physiological factor and its development is in no way affected by the use of corrective lenses, which simply enable presbyopes to see near objects clearly.
 

 

 

 

 

  I wear progressives all day long and they’re just fine. But I find that my eyes tire a lot when I’m at the computer. Is there a special kind of lens for working at the computer?
Indo’s LifeMADE Work lenses are designed to adapt to people’s different work environments, so clients can choose the distances to be covered by their lenses, depending on their work. LifeMADE Work lenses are therefore not only ideal for people who work with computers, but can also be adapted to the needs of people in a wide variety of professions: musicians, teachers, hairdressers, cooks, etc.
With its LifeMADE Work lenses, Indo provides visual comfort coupled with effective adaptation to the user's activities. LifeMADE Work lenses facilitate near and intermediate vision considerably. Furthermore, the peripheral distortion is not so noticeable as with a conventional progressive lens, because the lens power varies considerably less.
 

 

 

 

 

  I wear my progressives all day and have no problems except that I get a bit dizzy when I’m driving. Is there a solution?
When driving, users need to be able to see far objects while retaining intermediate vision for items such as the vehicle dashboard and controls. Indo’s LifeMADE Drive progressive lenses are designed to give extended far vision with a wider lateral field to provide a better view of wing mirrors, with less peripheral distortion. The design of these lenses markedly increases driver comfort and safety by improving both intermediate and far vision.
 

 

 

 

 

  What does it mean if your eyes are “zero prescription”?
Eyes are zero prescription or emmetropic when the image of an object at an infinite distance is formed on the retina and accommodated without any effort. In other words, the eyes see perfectly and do not need corrective lenses.
 

 

 

 

 

  What is nearsightedness (myopia)?
Myopia or nearsightedness is a refractive defect of the eye in which the image of an object at an infinite distance is formed in front of the retina, so the image formed on the retina is blurred.
Myopia is corrected with negative or diverging lenses.
 

 

 

 

 

  What is farsightedness (hyperopia)?
Hyperopia or farsightedness is a refractive defect of the eye in which the image of an object at an infinite distance is formed behind the retina, so the image formed on the retina is blurred.
 

 

 

 

 

  Will a child with hyperopia always need glasses?
It is common for children to be born with slight hyperopia but, due to the development of the human eye during growth, children's eyes can frequently become normal by the time they are six.
 

 

 

 

 

  What is astigmatism?
Astigmatism is a refractive defect of the eye in which rays of light coming from an object never converge at a single focal point, but are dispersed to different points. It is usually due to the curvature of the cornea and prevents the eye from seeing near and far objects clearly.
Astigmatism is usually hereditary, but may also be caused by complications after surgery, trauma and illness.
Besides affecting the vision, astigmatism can cause headaches and dizziness, because the eye muscles are strained in an attempt to compensate for the defect.
 

 

 

 

 

  What steps can I take to avoid needing a higher prescription?
All refractive defects of the eye include a genetic or physical component. However, there are a number of perfectly valid visual-hygiene rules to ensure the degree of myopia is not increased owing to bad habits:

- Do not get too close to a written text or computer screen when reading.
- Make sure you have good overhead lighting when reading (avoid using only desktop lamps for studying).
- Do not watch TV with the lights off.
- Eat a balanced diet.
- If you work at a computer screen, rest your eyes every 20 minutes by looking alternately at far and close objects 2 or 3 times. This will refresh the visual system.
 

 

 

 

 

  My eyes get very tired when I drive at night. Is there a solution?
Indo has launched the first lenses specially designed for night vision. Indo for Night lenses have a yellow filter that increases contrasts in conditions with little light. They are specially recommended for users who need good-quality contrast and precision at night. Greater safety comes with better visibility.
 

 

 

 

 

  I don’t need prescription glasses, but my eyes get tired when I’m at the computer. Is there a solution?
Computers, fluorescent lighting, air conditioning... There are many factors that can tire your eyes while you’re working.
 

 

 

 

 

  How can I choose the best sun protection for my eyes?
The EC classifies sunglasses into 5 categories, from 0 to 4, depending on the amount of visible light they absorb and the colour of the lenses. Category 4 is darker than category 0.
Warning: This does not mean the lens absorbs more or less amounts of UV (Ultra Violet) rays. Lenses that provide 100% protection from UV rays are marked as follows:

Consequently, a darker lens does not mean greater UV protection. In fact, a colourless Indo organic lens provides 95% protection from UV rays.
 

 

 

 

 

  Is it wrong to wear sunglasses without UV (Ultra Violet) protection or is it the same as not wearing sunglasses?
Wearing dark sunglasses without UV protection is worse than not wearing any. This is because, to protect the eye from the light, the pupil in the human eye narrows automatically when the light is bright. If that eye has a dark lens in front of it, it acts as though there is little light and the pupil opens up. Therefore, more UV rays enter than when you don’t wear sunglasses.
 

 

 

 

 

  What are polarized sunglasses?
When light is reflected on a flat surface (water, snow, ice, wet asphalt, windscreen, etc.), its vibrating components are modified and the light becomes polarized (vibrates in only one direction). This produces a harsh glare that alters the way you see shapes and colours and reduces contrast.
Traditional sunglasses do not block this reflected glare, whereas Indo’s polarized lenses separate the useful light from the harsh polarized light.
 

 

 

 

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